Fort Klock Historic Restoration
& Indian Castle Church

Key to the Schaeffer Books by Herman Witthoff

THE LOYAL AMERICANS
SHAVER EMIGRANTS TO CANADA**
The Descendants of Maria Elizabeth Schaffer,
Four Generations (1664-1749)
The Descendants of Maria Schaeffer/John Merkley
(1750-1833)
The Descendants of Johannes Schaffer
(1751-1828)
The Descendants of Nicholas Schaeffer
(1752-1838)
The Descendants of Frederick Schaeffer
(1760-1818)
The Descendants of Nicholas Shaver
(1726-1805)
The Descendants of Philip Shaver
(1731-1805)
book is indexed and numbered by itself.

Number of descendants in each book:

Maria Elizabeth Schäffer 146
Maria Schaeffer/Jacob H. Merckel 120
Johannes Schaeffer 506
Nicholas Schaeffer 834
Frederick Schaeffer 2,010
Nicholas Shaver 868
Philip Shaver 1,188
TOTAL SHAVER FAMILY 5,672

MARIA ELIZABETH SCHÄFFER
(Hunter Lists #636)
MATRIARCH OF THE SCHÄFFER FAMILY IN AMERICA

The following is a quote, permission graciously granted by Henry Jones, Jr., from his 2 volume
work, THE PALATINE FAMILIES OF NEW YORK 1710, "A Study of the German Immigrants Who
Arrived in Colonial New York in 1710," 1985, 1,350 pages, indexed, copies of which can be purchased
from him at Henry A. Jones, Jr., PO Box 261388, San Diego, CA 92196-1338, $89.50.

This book by Henry Z. Jones, Jr., documents Mara Elisabeth Schäffer and her family who settled
in Schoharie County, NY. We still don't know the German village of her origin, but Henry Jones is
preparing to issue a new book on these early Palatines in the next few months and hopes to have
discovered it. We hope he is successful in his search!

"Maria Elisabetha Schäfferin made her first appearance on the Hunter Lists 30 June 1710 with 4
pers. over 10 yrs. of age and 2 pers. under 10 in the family. Her last entry on Hunter was 4 Aug 1710 with
5 pers. over 10 and 3 pers. under 10 yrs. of age. Her listing may have been continued by #627 Johannes
Schäffer: 1) his entries begin 4 Oct 1710 with 5 pers. over 10 and under 10 yrs. when #637 Maria
Elisabetha Schäfferin's end; and 2) a Johannes Schäffer sp. Henrich Meyer at West Camp in 1711, and
a Henrich Meyer was recorded near Maria Elisabetha Schäfferin on the the June 1710 Hunter Roll (HJ).
Maria Schäfer, the mother was listed with Johann Schäfer and his family on Pastor Sommer's Family List
ca. 1744 (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.). Elisabeth Schäfer d. 28 March 1749, aged 85 yrs. (Schoharie Luth.
Chbk.). The ch. of Maria Elisabetha Schäfferin (erroneously attributed to #634 Gerhard Schäffer in the 1
past - HJ) were:

1) "Johannes (HJ). Perhaps he was the John Schaffer of Queensbury who was a Palatine 2
Volunteer to Canada in 1711 (HJ). A Johannes Schaffer sp. Henrich Meyer in 1711 (West Camp
Luth. Chbk.). Johannes Schäffer and his wife Anna Maria were recorded next to the Hanss
Henrich and Johannes Zöller families at Neu-Ansberg ca. 1716/17 (Simmendinger Register).
Pastor Berkenmeyer mentioned Johannes Schäffer often in Albany Protocol. In 1736 on p. 190
he wrote:

"After the service we returned to the home of Hannes Scheffer. The first thing he said was
to ask me why I had bpt. the child b. out of wedlock, without having the mother first do
pennance in the church. It was he who had said to Van Diren that he would not come
again if he were willing to bpt. the child. When I remonstrated in a kindly way, I received
the answer that I had put blame on the Luth. congregation and that if the Amsterdam
Consistory did not adhere closer to the Luth. doctrine, then he would have nothing to do
with it. There was no way of calming him down until his anger had spent itself. Then he
asked me to have dinner with him, but I refused and said I should be happy to do so
tomorrow after the first service. (See also pp. 98, 100, 161, 197, and 218 for more
references to Johannes Schäffer in the Protocol).

"Johannes Scheffer signed as a Justice on the call from the Luth. Church at Schoharie to Rev. Dr.
Gerdes in London 25 Aug 1741 (Luth. Church in N.Y. and N.J., p. 171). His family appears on.Pastor Sommer's Family List ca. 1744 (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.) Johannis Sheefer was a freeholder
at Schoharie in 1763 (Albany Co. Freeholders). Johannes md. Anna Maria Zoller (HJ); she d. 2
15 Jul 1768 (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.). Johannes d. 15 May 1777, aged 87 (?) yrs. (Schoharie 2
Luth. Chbk.). The had ch.:

i) "Johannes , b. 4 June 1717 and bpt. Schoharie - sp.: Johann Zoeller and wife (West 3
Camp Luth. Chbk.). He md. Anna Gertraud Staring 11 Oct 1740 (Schoharie Ref.
Chbk.). Johannes was noted on Pastor Sommer's Family List ca. 1744 also. Johannes 3
Sheefer Jr. was a freeholder at Schoharrie in 1763 (Albany Co. Freeholders). Hannes
Scheefer jun: was an Insein in Capt. Jacob Sternberger's Company at Schohare in 1767
(Report of the State Historian, Vol. II, p. 842).

ii) "Elisabetha , md. as d/o Johannes 12 Oct 1736 Henrick Kneskern at Schoharie 3 2
(Loonenburg Luth. Chbk.).
iii) "Henrich (Pastor Sommer's Family List). Henrich, Martinus, and Johannes Scheffer 3
were conf. at Schohare in 1737 (Loonenburg Luth. Chbk.). Henrich md. 1 Nov 1748 3
Eva Sternberger (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.). Their Family Bible is to be found in the attic
of the Old Stone Fort at Schoharie (HJ). Henrich drowned 8 April 1757 (Schoharie 3
Luth. Chbk.)
iv) "Martinus (Pastor Sommer's Family List). Mardeinus, Jacob, and Adam Schaeffer 3
were also in Capt. Jacob Sternberger's Company at Schohare 2 May 1767 (Report of the
State Historian, Vol. II, p. 843). Martinus md. Sarah Rickert 5 Nov 1751 (Schoharie 3
Luth. Chbk.).
v) "Jacob (Pastor Sommer's Family List). He was conf. Dom. 17 Trin.: 1739 at Shohare 3
(Loonenburg Luth. Chbk.). Jacob Sheefer was a freeholder at Schoharrie in 1763
(Albany Co. Freeholders). Jacob md. 2 Nov 1748 Elisabetha Rickert (Schoharie Luth. 3
Chbk.).
vi) "Jost (Pastor Sommer's Family List). Joh. Jost Schaffer was conf. 24 May 1741 at 3
Scohare (Loonenburg Luth. Chbk.). He d. 10 Nov 1747, aged 23 yrs. (Schoharie Luth.
Chbk.).
vii) "Adam (Pastor Sommer's Family List). Adam Sheefer was a freeholder at Schoharrie 3
in 1763 (Albany Co. Freeholders). He md. Maria Magdalena Hüls 11 Apr 1749
(Schoharie Luth. and Ref. Chbks.).

2) "Henrich (HJ). Johann Heinrich Schaster was conf. 23 March 1712 at Queensberg (West 2
Camp Luth. Chbk.). Pastor Berkenmeyer called Henrich the brother of (Jo)hannes in 1736 2 2
(Albany Protocol, p. 189). His family was noted on Pastor Sommer's Family List ca. 1744 and
with them, his wife's mother (Anna) Maria Schäfer (w/o Gerd Schäfer - HJ). Henrick Sheefer (2
of that name) was a freeholder at Schoharrie in 1763 (Albany Co. Freeholders.) Henrich md. 2
(Anna) Maria Margaretha, d/o #634 Gerhard Schäffer (HJ). She d. 7 Sep 1775, aged 75 yrs.,.and Henrich d. 29 Aug 1776, aged 78 yrs. (both Schoharie Luth. Chbk.). Issue:

1) "Elisabetha (HJ), md. Johann Nicolaus Becker 25 Sept 1742 (Schoharie Ref. Chbk.). 3
ii) "Christian (Pastor Sommer's Family List), md. 20 Oct 1747 Maria Elisabetha 3
Kneskern (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.).
iii) "Maria (Pastor Sommer's Family List), md. 19 Oct 1749 Sebastian Becker 3
(Schoharie Ref. Chbk.).
iv) "Catharina (Pastor Sommer's Familly List), md. 15 Oct 1745 Jost Kneskern 3
(Schoharie Luth. Chbk.).
v) "Sophia (Pastor Sommer's Family List), md. 22 March 1748 Johannes Kneskern 3
(Schoharie Luth. Chbk.)
vi) "Anna (Pastor Sommer's Family List), md. 26 Sept 1751 Conrad Rickert Jr. 3
(Schoharie Ref. Chbk.).
vii) "Christina (Pastor Sommer's Family List), md. 9 Aug 1757 Christ: Ernst Ottmann 3
(Schoharie Luth. Chbk.)
viii) "Jacob , bpt. 10 May 1734/35 - sp.: Johs. Scheyffer and A. Maria Scheyffer 3
(Schoharie Ref. Chbk.). This Jacob md. 21 March 1758 Anna Bellinger, who d. 5 Dec
1766, aged 27 yrs.; he md. 2nd Catharina Zeh 24 April 1768 (all Schoharie Luth. Chbk.).
ix) "Sarah , bpt. 13 March 1736/37 - sp.: Coenr. Ryckaert and Elys. Ryckert (Schoharie 3
Ref. Chbk.). She md. 20 Nov 1764 Jacob Schmidt (Schoharie Luth. Chbk.)
x) "Eva , bpt. 25 March 1738/39 - sp.: Johan Philip Fux and wife Eva (Schoharie Ref. 3
Chbk.).
xi) "Dorothea , bpt. 16 April 1743 - sp.: Hannis Scheffer and wife (Schoharie Ref. Chbk.) 3

"In one of the Schoharie Schäffer families belongs the Margareta Elisabeth Schefferin conf. 8 Oct
1741 at Schohare (Lunenburg Luth. Chbk.).

"Also, the Anna Sibylla Schaster conf. 16 Feb 1716 at Newtown should be placed in one of the
many Schäffer families of colonial N.Y. She probably was the Anna Sibella Shefering aged 10, d/o Ann.
Maria S., bound to Dr. John Nerbury of Ferry, L.I. on 17 Oct 1710 on the Apprenticeship Lists (HJ)."
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Who Were the Loyalists?
by F. Eleanor Chapin

"The story of the Loyalists is a fascinating narrative of loyalty, courage
and hardship. As British subjects living in the American colonies, they
maintained their loyalty to the Crown in 1775 when a large number of dissidents
chose to rebel against their king, George III, break away from Britain and form
a new nation. However, about a third of the population in the Thirteen Colonies
wished to remain under British rule. They were ordinary folk--farmers,
tradesmen, merchants and a few professionals of various ethnic origins, as well
as many native people who fought alongside the British.

"The 'U.E. Loyalist' was one who resided in the American colonies prior to
the Revolutionary War, joined the British forces, and as a result had his
property confiscated. Eventually forced to flee to Canada, England, Florida or
the West Indies, the Loyalist had to be in Canada by 1789.

"Large sections of territory were acquired from the Indian nations and in
July 1783 King George III decreed that the Loyalists should be granted land.
Those who had "adhered to the 'Unity of the Empire'", as well as their sons and
daughters, were eligible to receive grants of 100 acres, without fees, from the
Land Boards. The Loyalists and their families eventually made their way to Upper
Canada and eventually received compensation for their losses. They received
rations and tools to support themselves during the first year. When the land was
surveyed, Loyalists received land commensurate with their position in the army.
A private received 200 acres while a general received a thousand or more. All
the children would each receive 100 acres on reaching the age of 21. A minimum
of 10 acres had to be cleared on each 200 acre lot and a building erected before
a deed would be issued; otherwise, the land reverted to the Crown. Many received
grants that were located miles away from where they had first settled and found
it impossible to reach. As more settlers arrived, the unclaimed lands were given
to the new arrivals.

"Regular British and German soldiers were considered to be 'military
claimants.'

"The Loyalists who returned to England, whether by choice or not, received
payment for their losses in England; they became known as 'Treasury Loyalists.'
Afterwards, if they decided to return to Canada to settle, they were no longer
entitled to free land. The Loyalists who settled in Nova Scotia and New
Brunswick received free land but their children did not. Within a few years,
many who settled there moved to Upper Canada. When Simcoe was named Lieutenant-Governor
in 1791, he asked many of his old officers who had settled in the
Maritimes to come and help him with his settlement plans in Upper Canada; many
did. Some of them had their names recorded in the 'U.E. List,' but they had to
prove that no land had been given to them in the Maritimes.

"In Nova Scotia there were the 'Pre-Loyalists' who had settled in the
colonies, sided with the British and left before the war broke out. Some of them
did fight for the British, others did not.

"There were also Loyalists, mainly of French origin who came from Kentucky
and Tennessee, who settled in Lower Canada and in the Detroit-Windsor area. Some
Scottish settlers went from Glengarry to man the fort at Detroit. Loyalist
settlements around Detroit, Niagara and Michilimackinac, near Sault St. Marie,. began as early as 1779.
"The 'Late Loyalists' or 'Simcoe's Loyalists' from New York and
Pennsylvania were offered free land for pioneering but were charged patent fees.

They may have remained loyal to the Crown during the war, but they did not take
up arms at that time and as a result their properties were not confiscated.
While their patriot neighbours troubled them for being partial to British rule,
when they decided to move to Upper Canada, they sold their properties and
retained their assets. Since they are not deemed to have actually suffered for
their attachment to the Crown, they do not bear the 'U.E.' title.

"Loyalists included people from many backgrounds, including Dutch, German,
Scots, Negroes, native Indians and some English; at times it is difficult to
determine the Loyalist's exact nationality.

"Loyalists fought in one of the corps such as the King's Royal Regiment of
New York or Butler's Rangers. They may have been with the Indian Department,
with one of the transport corps driving a supply wagon, working in a bateau or
as a member of the spy network. Many of them assisted persecuted families to
cross the border, especially Quakers whose religion forbade them to bear arms but
who still wished to remain under British rule.

"The studies of history and genealogy go hand-in-hand. A useful means for
understanding historical events is to learn about the experiences of one's
family.

"The Loyalists faced many difficulties. Virgin forests had to be cleared,
a makeshift home erected and a crop planted. They built the first roads,
churches, schools, mills and villages. Maintaining their health was difficult;
failure meant disease, inability to support the family and often death. At that
time, only half the newborn babies would reach the age of five while the average
life expectancy was about 35 years.

"In 1789 Governor Sir Guy Carlelton (1724-1808), declared that, as a mark
of honour, all those who had remained loyal to the principle of a United Empire
and who had joined the Royal Standard in America before 1783 should "be
distinguished by the letters U.E. affixed to their names." A list was compiled
of those who qualified but some names were never entered.

"Much information is available about the Loyalists in the 'Loyalist
Claims.'"

NOTE: This has been printed with the permission of Eleanor Chapin, Author, and
published in LOYALIST FAMILIES OF THE GRAND RIVER BRANCH, UNITED EMPIRE
LOYALISTS' ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, Copyright 1991, Grand River Branch,
U.E.L..RANDOM HOUSE DICTIONARY,
2nd Edition (New York: Random House Publishers, 1
1988, p. 144.

Thomas C. Cochran and Wayne Andrews, eds., CONCISE DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN 2
HISTORY (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1961, p. 552. The best known Liberty
Pole was erected in New York City (1776) to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp
Act. It became the focus of brawls between British soldiers and Liberty Boys.
The original Liberty Tree was an elm at the intersection of Washington and Essex
Streets, Boston, where British oppression was denounced and unpopular officials
were hung in effigy. It was cut down by British soldiers in 1775.

Persecution of the Loyalists (or Tories)
by Angela E. M. Files

"The noun 'persecution' means 'pursue with harassing or oppressive
treatment especially because of religion, race or belief.' For their belief in
the British system of government and the Crown, the Loyalists or Tories were
persecuted before, during and after the Revolutionary War. Most historians of
this war agree there were two types of persecution to which the Loyalists were
subjected, oppresive treatment by lawless mobs, and abuses carried out
constitutionally by unjust and cruel laws authorized by the Thirteen Colonies.

It was at the hands of the mob that the Loyalists first suffered persecution.
On 26 August 1765 Sam Adams organized the Sons of Liberty, a secret organization
of artisans, shipyard workers and wharfingers of northern Boston who were opposed
to the Stamp Act that had been passed by the British Parliment for raising
revenue in the thirteen colonies. The Sons of Liberty met around a liberty pole
or tree, and 'pledged their sacred fortunes and their sacred honors.' The Sons 2
of Liberty planned and incited atrocities against the Loyalists through the use
of mobs and propaganda. Sam Adams was the Master of Propoganda against the
Loyalists.

"During that same year Thomas Hutchinson, the Lieutenant (Acting) Governor,
attempted to enforce the Stamp Act. Samuel Adams, James Otis and a radical mob
attacked and destroyed the magnificent home and library of Governor Hutchinson
and the home of his brother-in-law, Judge and stamp collector Andrew Oliver. The
Boston mob broke down the doors with broadaxes, destroyed the furniture, stole
the jewels and money, scattered the papers and books, drunk the wine in the
cellar and dismantled the roof and walls. The families barely escaped with their
lives!

"Meanwhile, Sons of Liberty associations sprung up in the Thirteen
Colonies. Through mob action, they intimidated the British officials through
vicious propaganda, they prompted the patriots to fight against those who were
loyal to the British Crown. In many of the colonial towns they created local
Committees of Correspondence to resistthe Tradeand Navigation
Acts imposed by the British government, Committeesof Inspection
to ensure that British trade was boycotted, and committees of
Safety which supplied the continental army with men and equipment.
"The conflict between the populace and the British soldiers in such towns
as New York and Boston led to such barbaric acts as the Boston Massacres.
"On March 5, 1770, the mob of rowdies, knowing well that the British
troops had strict orders not to fire on the populace, pelted and
insulted a patrol and mocked it with commands of "fire"! In the
confusion the patrol did fire and four or five of the mob were
killed. A young lawyer named John Adams risked his career to defend
the soldiers in court, and they received only a technical
punishment."3

Leland D. Baldwin,
THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY (New York: American Book 3
Co., 1952), pp. 221-22.

William H. Nelson, THE AMERICAN TORY (London: Oxford Clarendon Press, 4
1966), p. 43.

Richard B. Morris, THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION RECONSIDERED (London: Harper & 5
Row Publishers, 1967)p. 131.

"Seventeen months before the commencement of the Revolutionary War, on 16
December 1773, a group of Bostonians, instigated by patriot Sam Adams and
disguised as Mohawk Indians, boarded three British ships and threw 342 chests of
tea, worth £18,000 wholesale, into the Boston harbour. This act was meant to
show defiance against England's taxation of goods imported into the American
colonies.

"The Sons of Liberty did manage to dump a consignment of East India
Company tea into New York Harbour, but only to the decorous strain
of 'God Save the King', played by a band on shore."4

"In other places the excesses of the mob were nearly as great as in Boston.
In New York, mobs were active in destroying printing presses which had printed
Loyalist pamphlets, in stealing cattle and personal property.
"The nucleus of such radical mob action was the Sons of Liberty,
groups first making their appearance in New England and New York, but
soon springing up in virtually every colonial town. These
organizations functioned as independent entities and in fact no one
has demonstrated a clear and undisputed lineage between them and
the...Committees of Correspondence....At the heart of radical
demonstrations was the 'mechanic,' a catchall term covering both
master employees and journeymen wage workers. The 'mechanics' were
the 'radicals' and as such were indispensable ingredients in fueling
the flame of political protests."5

"One of the favourite pastimes of the mob was to tar and feather 'obnoxious
Tories.' The tar was usually heated before the victim was stripped naked. The
hissing tar was poured over the victim's head, shoulder, chest and back and
feathers were placed over the pine tar. The victim was then paraded about the
streets in a cart for all the townspeople to see what happens to supporters of
the British government.

"Another form of torture inflicted on some of the Tories was to force them
to ride the rail. This involved placing the 'unhappy victim' upon sharp rails
with one leg on each side; each rail was carried upon the shoulders of two tall
men, with a man on each side to keep the poor wretch straight and fixed in his
seat.

"Seth Seeley, a Connecticut farmer, who later fled to New Brunswick
was brought before a local committee in 1776 and, as punishment for
signing a declaration to support the king's laws was put on a rail,
carried on men's shoulders through the streets, put into stocks and
besmeared with eggs and was robbed of money for the entertainment of
the Company."6

Wallace Brown and Senoir Hereward, VICTORIOUS IN DEFEAT, THE LOYALISTS IN 6
CANADA (Agincourt, Ont.: Methuen Publications, 1984), p. 16.

"Some of the other acts of extreme cruelty used on the Tories by the
Patriots were hoisting enemies of liberty up a liberty pole with a dead animal
on the pole; forcing a Tory to ride an unsaddled horse with his face to the tail
of the horse and his coat turned inside out; sitting Tories on lumps of coal;
whipping, cropping ears, placing the enemy in the pillory or stockade. The mob
could at times be moved by extremely reactionary impulses and cruel acts.
"Some of the revolutionary leaders encouraged the sadistics acts of the
mobs. In December 1776 the Provincial Congress of New York went so far as to
order the Committee of Public Safe to purchase all the pitch and tar necessary
for the public's use and safety.

"General George Washington seems to have approved mob persecution of the
Tories. In 1776 General Israel Putnam, one of Washington's generals, met a
procession of the Sons of Liberty parading a number of Tories on rails up and
down the streets of New York and he attempted to halt this inhuman proceeding.
On hearing this, Washington reprimanded General Putnam, stating that "to
discourage such proceedings was to injure the cause of liberty in which they were
engaged, and that nobody would attempt it but an enemy of his country."
"As the revolution progressed, semi-official organizations began to harass
the Tories. The Continental Congress or Provincial Congress laid down the
general policy to be observed in the treatment of Tories, and local committees
carried it out in detail. Early in 1776 the Continental Congress, which at the
time had no basis in law, recommended that Tories be disarmed; it was the
committee which then enforced the recommendation. Tories were arrested, tried,
exiled to other districts and, in some cases, imprisoned. A few Tories,
particularly in the southern states, were hung.

"The political situation changed in the colonies when the Declaration of
Independence was adopted on 4 July 1776. It recounted the grievances of the
colonies against the British Crown and declared the colonies to be free and
independent states. Loyalism to the British Crown became the equivalent of
treason to the state. Penalties for treason began to be laid against the Tories.
"The Declaration of Independence was followed by the Test Laws which
required all colonists to swear allegiance to the state in which they lived. A
record was kept of those who took the oath and they were issued a certificate for
safety from arrest. Failure to take the oath meant possible imprisonment,
confiscation of property, banishment and even death.

"The Test oath was to enforce a declaration of principle from those
who were indifferent to or were secret enemies of the Revolution,
state legislators enacted 'test' laws. (sic) The oath demanded by
these laws varied in different colonies that adopted them, but in
general they prescribed loyalty to the patriot cause, disloyalty to
the British government, and promise not to aid and abet the enemy.
In the Test Acts passed before the Declaration of Independence "the
oath of abjuration and allegiance was omitted."7

Mark M. Botner III, ENYCLOPEDIA OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (New York: David 7
MacKay Co., 1974, p. 1094.
W. Stuart Wallace, "The United Empire Loyalists, A Chronicle of the Great 8
Migration," CHRONICLES OF CANADA (Toronto: Glasgow Brooke & Co., 1920), p. 26.
Richard B. Morris and Jeffrey B. Morris, eds., ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF AMERICAN 9
HISTORY, 6th Edition (New York: Harper & Row Publishers, 1982), p. 130.
North Callahan, FLIGHT FROM THE REPUBLIC, THE TORIES OF THE AMERICAN 10
REVOLUTION (New York: Howard W. Sams & Co., 1967), p. 120.

"The Tory who refused to take the oath of allegiance became an outlaw. He
did not even have the right of a foreigner in the courts of law. If his
neighbours owned him money, he had no legal redress. No relative or friend could
leave an orphan child to his guardianship. He could not be the administrator or
executor of a person's estate. If he was a lawyer, doctor or someone with some
other profession, he was often denied the right to practice his profession.
"Among the Whigs there was opposition to the Test Laws. Peter Van Schaak,
a moderate Whig from New York State disapproved of the Test Laws and left the
Revolutionary Party. "Had you," he wrote, "at the beginning of the war,
permitted every one differing in sentiment from you, to take the other side, or
at least to have moved out of the State, with their property...it would have been
a conduct magnanimous and just. But, now, after restraining those persons from
removing; punishing them, if in the attempt they were apprehended; selling their
estates if they escaped; compelling them to the duties of subjects under heavy
penalties; deriving aid from them in the prosecution of the war...now to compel
them to take an oath is an act of severity."8

"The early Test Laws passed by the revolutionary governments in 1776-1777,
requiring a repudiation of loyalty to George III were followed
by more repressive measures. Nine states passed acts exiling
prominent Tories, five states defranchised all Tories, and in most
of the states Loyalists were expelled from all offices, barred from
the professions, and forced to pay double or treble taxes."9
"On 27 November 1777 Congress recommended to the states that they
appropriate the property of residents who had forfeited "the right to protection"
of the revolutionary government. The treasury of the Continental Congress was
empty so the confiscation of properties owned by Tories provided an excellent
means for filling the congressional coffers. In a resolution passed by the
Continental Congress, it was recommended that the states invest the proceeds of
the land sales in continental loan certificates. As Loyalists began leaving the
Thirteen Colonies during the Revolutionary War, large sums of money from the
sales of confiscated Tory properties began to find their way into state
treasuries.

"The Revolutionary War ended officially in 1783 with the signing of the
Treaty of Paris. Provisions were made in the treaty for the Loyalists, requiring
that they be treated "not only with justice and equity, but with that spirit of
reconciliation which on the return of the blessings of peace, should universally
prevail."10.Ibid., pp. 120-121. 11
Ibid., p. 121. 12
Walter Stewart, TRUE BLUE, A LOYALIST LEGEND (Don Mills, Ont.: Collins 13
Publishers, 1985), p. 221.

"The action of the state legislatures did not follow the provisions in the
treaty. Article 5 of the treaty stated that "Congress shall earnestly recommend
to the state legislatures that they provide for the restitution of all estates,
rights and properties which have been confiscated and which belonged to real
British subjects. Also the Loyalists were to be permitted to go to any part in
the thirteen colonies and remain there for twelve months, "unmolested in their
endeavours to obtain such restitution."11

"Article 6 of the treaty stated that "there should be no future
confiscation or collection of damages and those confined should be released and
not prosecuted."12

"The seizure of Tory properties continued after the Revolutionary War and
those acts of confiscation were not punished by American courts. The estate of
Oliver de Lancey, Andrew Lambert, John Leonard, Philip Kearney, Cortlandt Skinner
and Benjamin Thompson of New Jersey were sold to the highest bidder after 1783.
The estates of John Graham and Sir James Wright of Georgia were sold after the
signing of the peace treaty. Very few loyalist properties were restored and
legal impediments were placed before Loyalists who wanted to collect debts owed
to them, despite the fact that Article 4 of the treaty stated that British
merchants were to meet no lawful obstacles in collecting their debts. There were
also those ready to purchase vast holdings at very low prices. Some of them
stirred up mob action to drive out the owners whose land the wished to obtain.
"Between 1783 and 1789 the British government appointed commissioners who
sat at Halifax, Saint John, Quebec, Montreal and in England at Lincoln's Field,
London to hear the claims of exiled Loyalists. The claimants could not be
expected to have brought documents with them in their flight. The commissioners
had to rely, instead, on the oaths and stories from claimants and other
witnesses.

"The commission heard 5,072 claims in England and Canada which
represent perhaps one out of twenty of the Loyalists. 954 of
these were withdrawn or disallowed. The claims totalled £8,026,045,
of which about a third--£3,292,452--was allowed. In addition 303 of
the exiles received pensions for life; these were nearly all widows.
Before it was over the British government spent about £7,500,000
losing the war." 13

"Between the years 1780 and 1781, the Provincial Congress of New York
appointed commissioners to detect and prevent any conspiracies by the internal
enemy--the Tories. The commissioners moved from place to place in order to
arrest the enemy. A true patriot of the state was to reveal the names of Tories
or be sent to prison. People were well-paid for being informers to the Patriots.
Bail for prisoners ranged from £40 to as high as £5,000. Any person who retained
allegiance to King George III was deemed to commit high treason. It was a felony
to possess or pay for goods in counterfeit continental money which was then
circulating in over forty different types.

Victor Hugo Palsits, MINUTES OF THE COMMISSIONERS FOR DETECTING AND 14
DEFEATING CONSPIRACIES IN THE STAE OF NEW YORK, ALBANY CO., SESSIONS 1778-1781,
Vol. II (Boston: Gregg Press, 1972), p. 646.

"Between 1778 and 1781 John Melchoir File and his eldest son Christopher,
along with his Tory neighbours in Rensselaerwyck, New York, were apprehended on
trumped-up charges, brought to trial before the New York Commissioners and fined
heavily. This is how John Melchoir File would have described experiences:
'I, John Melchoir File, of the Hudson Valley, New York, father of a
large family, was a persecuted loyalist. With many of my fellow
German neighbours, I fought at the Battle of Saratoga and witnessed
the sad defeat of the British soldiers and the slaughter of young
mercenary Hessian soldiers who did not understand the terrain of our
area. My second son, John File fought with Butler's Rangers and the
New York Royal Regiment.

'From 1778 to 1781, my oldest son Christoper and I were fined heavily
for helping Loyalists to escape to Canada, supplying the British army
and the Indians with food. Our last imprisonment was for helping
Blacksmith Andries Stohl and Farmer Harper Lansing escape from the
cruel confinement of Serg. Elijah Adams, a continental officer. 14
Serg. Adams enjoyed the cruel Sport of finding loyalists for the
Commissioners because they gave him a fat fee for each loyalist's
name.'

'During these commission trials my beloved wife Elizabeth Hunsinger
died of grief. My sons Corporal John File and his brother Melchoir
fled to Canada. The Patriot neighbours also harassed son Jacoab so
he and his family fled to Brant County after the War of 1812-1814.
'In my opinion, we, Tories or Loyalists, were the most persecuted
group of the American Revolution. You must try to walk in our shoes
in order to understand the effect persecution had on our lives. Oil
did gradually take off the tar and feathers from the skin of victims
but the psychological effect of this cruel treatment lasted a
lifetime. The experience of imprisonment in the Albany Jail will
always remain with me.'"

NOTE: This has been printed with the permission of Angela E. M. Files, Author,
and published in LOYALIST FAMILIES OF THE GRAND RIVER BRANCH, UNITED EMPIRE
LOYALISTS' ASSOCIATION OF CANADA, Copyright 1991, Grand River Branch, U.E.L..Historical Account
Of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church And Parsonage
Pastor Herman Hayunga has w&ten a history of the origins
of St. Peter>, o?uted January 1, 1829, in the earliest church
register. It reads as follows:

A Sketch of History of these Lutheran Congregations in
Williamsburgh

1. The primitive Willbg Settlers were Germans who first
resided in Schoharie and different other places of NY
province. When the Revolutionary War broke out - they
being tories - took up arms in defence of the Crown of
England. Being unsuccessful - they retreated to Niagara -
river and crossed over to the Canada Shore, and spent the
Winter of 1784 near Kingston.

2. About 40 families settled in Williamsburg of these tory
soldiers - and about 25 of these were Lutherans - They were
landed here on the 20th July, 1784 on the Banks of the St.
Lawrence River. All was here forest and wilderness then.
Govt provided for them for 2% years provisions, and tools
and clothing - as if they were yet soldiers, giving them time
to clear their land etc. Each family-father got 200 Acres of
land. These were called U. E. Loyalists. His wife and each
child were entitled to 200 Acres of land each.

3. The Lutherans began to hold lay-reading in August 1784, &
sung hymns - all in the German language every Sabbath.
They sent that same year to Philadelphia - a messenger - to
purchase for them a book of printed sermons - in the German
language - who returned with it. From these - one was read
every Sunday - after they had assembled. The Marburger
Gesangbuch was the Hymnbook they used. The book is still
in the safe keeping of Henry Markley. I have seen it.

4. After 4 years - of their settling, in 1788 - they began to build
a Lutheran frame Church in the front, on the Centre Commons
of the Township of Willbg - but it was not raised - on account
of the severity of the weather in that fall. The winter having
set in sooner than was expected.

5. In March 1789 - The Church was raised and the work went
on very rapidly. Colonel Henry Markley was the
Master-builder.
lxi.

6. In March 1789 - They sent a Message to the Revd Samuel
Swartfeger who resided near Albany - and Troy - whom some
of them had before the war heard - inviting him to become
their Pastor. He accepted a Call and came & in June 1789 he
consecrated the church to Almighty God. The name was
Zion’s Church. It was the first Lutheran Church built in
Upper Canada and the First Protestant Church in all the
Canadas. It was called the “Dutch” Church by the English. In
the Church-books - it was called the “German Protestant
Church’*.

7. In 1793 - the Lutherans petitioned the Provincial Parliament
for the one half of the Centre Commons - as a glebe for the
Lutheran congregation here - and they received a favourable
answer. They took possession of it and cleared the Land &
Laid out an Orchard and built a parsonage house on the
East-half of the said Centre-Commons - for the use of their
Lutheran Pastor.

8. In 1803 - The Revd S. Swartfeger died here, he had
officiated about 14 years very acceptably to the people.

9. In 1804, They invited the Revd Meyer from the Bay of
Quinty to become their Pastor. He did so. They sent him to
Philadelphia to be ordained. He was ordained there and
returned to them.

10. From 1805 - 1807 - he continued with them, and then left
them. He went to Lancaster in Pennsylvania.

11. In 1808 they gave Mr. I.G. Weigandt - in the Bay of Quinty
(the Son-in Law of the Revd S. Swartfeger) a Call & he
preached acceptably for them. He resided in their
parsonage.

12. In 1811 The Revd Weigandt secretly joined the Church of
England - was reordained in Quebeck by the Prot. Ep.
Bishop - Dr. Mountain and revolutionized the peaceable
congregation still pretending to be a Lutheran Minister -
while he had subscribed the 39 articles and got a govt Salary
of t200 sterling yearly, in order to Church of Englandize
these Lutherans in Williamsburgh.

13. At length the secret scheme leaked out and never was
perhaps greater Confusion here than at that time. Some
followed him and he raised a small Church of England Cong.
from among these Luth. From this time forth - he preached
lxii.in English & German - but his prayers were always read in
the English, according to the Book of Common Prayer.

14. In 1814 the Lutherans invited the Revd Meyer to return to
them. They sent in the winter of that year 2 sleighs to Lan-
caster and fetched him and his family here. He was in very
straitened circumstances when he arrived here for the
second time.

15. When the Lutherans demanded their Church & Glebe from
Mr. W. he did them defiance - and forbid them to enter into
the Church except they acknowledged the 39 Articles. - He
put a padlock on the Church-door - and made an
Advertisement to that Effect - signed by himself and his 5
Church wardens.

16. The Revd Mr. Meyer preached in Houses & Schoolhouses
till after a meeting with Mr. Weigandt was held - and it was
agreed that each Cong. - should alternately occupy the
Church on Sundays but the Glebe & House Mr. Weigandt
kept in possession in despite of alI they could do to the
contrary, for they had no deed for it.

17. In 1817 M. [Meyer] gave up preaching as a Lutheran - went
to Quebec & joined the Prot. Ep. Church and settled in
Matilda.

18. In 1824 - Mr. Rev. Goertner - by chance - (or more
Christianly to speak - by direction of God’s Providence)
found out the destitution of these Cong., while traveling in
this part of Canada.

19. In 1825 - the Revd J. Senderling - visited them for a short
time.

20. In 1826 The Revd H. Hayunga accepted a call of them
has endeavoured to gather the scattered flock together,
afterwards divided it into 2 congregations of Lutherans.

According to church records, the first church building of the
new St. Peter’s Congregation was erected by “the members of
the Evangelical Lutheran and Presbyterian Congregations...in
the fifth Concession of the Upper-Bush in the Township of
Williamsburg.” This church was consecrated “to the service of
Almighty God” by the Rev. H. Hayunga on June 24, 1827.
“The Presbyterians had no Minister at that time.” .__ .
lxiii.

THE SHAVER FAMILY
from
The Town of Fulton, Schoharie Co., NY

For the past few years, I have done research on two Schaeffer/Shaver/Shafer families other than
this Shaver family who settled the Town of Fulton, Schoharie Co., NY. Usually, the spelling of the surname
has no significance. People in the same family and different generations used different spellings, but this
family has insisted on the spelling, "Shaver," with one family exception.

My first Schäffer family interest was the family of Maria Schäffer and her two sons, Johannes and
Heinrich, who settled in Schoharie, Schoharie Co., NY, and are documented in Henry Z. Jones' book,
THE PALATINE FAMILIES OF NEW YORK 1710, 1985. Johannes Schäffer is my line of descent.
Then I became aware of the Schaeffer family who settled in the Town of Andes, Delaware Co.,
NY, founding the hamlet of Shavertown. Since New York City created the Pepacton Reservoir for a
water supply, this area is now flooded. Two brothers, Jacob and John Shaver, came from Dutchess Co.,
NY, and later more of their family did also.

I also found out about the Town of Fulton Shavers. I attended four of the family reunions with their
researcher, Lois Donovan, now deceased. I also had conversations with Katherine Latham, RD 1 Box
18B, Westerlo, NY 12193, Tel: 518-797-3295 and Roger Shafer, HCR 1 Box 5, Central Bridge, NY
12035, Tel: 518-868-2589.

I was constantly looking for a link between the families, my Schoharie Schäffers, the Shavertown
Shavers and the Town of Fulton Shavers.

The Town of Fulton, Schoharie Co., NY, Shaver family held a "60th Shaver Family Reunion", 8
September 1996, at the Max Shaul State Park located on State Route 30 in Fultonham, NY. The Max
Shaul State Park is located not very far from the George Shaver Homestead on Rossman Hill. This is
where all the Shaver children were born, not actually in the house standing at present, but a log cabin on
this property near this site.

This Shaver family does not know the names of the parents of their patriarch, George Shaver but
do know his exact date of birth, 30 November 1800. The 1855 census says that he was born in Schoharie
County, NY. They know the exact date of birth of his wife, Jane Mulford, 26 May 1805, and place of
birth according to the 1855 census, Blenheim, Schoharie Co., NY.

Another Shafer researcher, Martha Foland, is pretty certain that George Shaver is the son of
Johannes Schaeffer and Dorothy Stam. Johannes was born and baptized in St. Paul's Lutheran Church,.
Town of Schoharie, Schoharie Co., NY, and Dorothy Stam was born in Palatine, Montgomery Co., NY.

They were married in Trinity Lutheran Church, Stone Arabia, T-Palatine, Montgomery Co., NY. They
had four other children: Margareta, Maria, Johann, and Anna. George's date of birth, 30 November 1800,
is compatible with the rest of the children in the family who are born between 1796 and 1805. However,
I have been unable to find baptismal records for any of his four children in any of the Montgomery,
Herkimer, or Schoharie Co. churches for which I have churchbooks that are transcribed by Kinship. This
might indicate that he moved out of the area.

In the death certificate of one of George's children, Pasco, it is stated that both his mother and
father's birthplace is Germany, but in the death certificate of his daughter, Margaret, and son, Adam Clark,
the parents' birthplace is given as New York State. So, we don't have any agreement here with his
children as to their parents' birthplace.

I find it hard to believe that no one knows the parents of George Shaver for quite a few reasons.
One, a couple years ago I met with Roger Shafer's grandmother, Emma (Cole) Shafer, born 11 December
1896. (Note that his family spells the name "Shafer" and all the rest of the family insist on the "Shaver"
spelling.) She was born 11 December 1896. She was really "sharp," remembering dates of birth of all the
Shafer ancestors I asked her about. Very good memory! Three of George's children, Pasco, died 1919,
Mary Catherine, died 1927, and Adam Clark, died 1924, were living at the time Emma (Cole) Shafer was
a teenager, and she probably knew some of these people, but most certainly knew their children and
children of the other members of the family. No one asked the question as to who the parents of George
were?

Another missing link is in the family of George's daughter, Mary Catherine Shaver who married
James Snyder. She is Catherine Snyder's ancestor. Certainly the ancestry of George Shaver must have
been talked about. No one ever asked who his parents were?

WHO WERE GEORGE SHAVER'S PARENTS?

Let's speculate and try out different theories! In the "old days," Victorian 1800's, there were things
that were just not talked about, such as illegitimate births, "Indian blood," etc. But, in this "modern age"
we are more liberal and understanding, and ususally "call a spade a spade"! Who were this George's
parents?

Another "twist" to this Shaver Puzzle was received, 9 August 1995. Ian Mc Giver, 1356 East
Madison Park, Chicago, IL 60615, has done extensive research on the settlers of the Byrne Patent, T-Fulton,
Schoharie Co., NY, and has written a treatise, "So Many
Changes & Abandonments: Euroamerican Settlement of the Byrne Patent, 1790-1810". "This brief article
is intended to advertise a larger project which will trace and analyze the long-term migration and settlement
patterns of the families that attempted to settle the Byrne Patent, located in the present-day town of Fulton,
Schoharie County, New York. This project will be, in effect, the genealogy of a neighborhood....."
On page 62 Ian Mc Giver tells about one of the settlers of the Byrne Patent. "SHAVER--In May
1806, the family of John Shaver took over the leasehold to lot #54, which had been settled by the Cornelius.
Van Dyke family. By June 1810, they had been replaced in turn by another family. It is not clear where
the Shaver family came from or went to, but theirs was a family name dating to the pre-Revolutionary
settlements of the Schohaire Valley. And Shavers (also, Shaffer, Shafer) persisted as farmers in the area
up to and including the present."

Lot #54 of the Byrne Patent is located northeast of West Fulton. Do you suppose that our "John"
(Johannes) is the one who took over the leasehold of Lot #54, became disenchanted with the hilly
topography and low viability of the land and moved on. Then he moved elsewhere in Schoharie County
and his son George was born, 30 November 1800, in Schoharie County. George was born in Schoharie
County according to the 1855 census but only lived there for 24 years, living elsewhere for 30 years. As
an adult George Shaver, married with one child, Moses, being born in Greene Co., NY, moved to
Rossman Hill, Town of Fulton, which is almost directly south of West Fulton, across the Panther Creek,
and lived there his remaining days, being buried there.

1. It is entirely possible that George is a child of Johannes Shaffer and Dorothy Stam as discussed
earlier.
2. Was his father born in Germany as Pasco's death cetificate states? I don't think so, since his
mother, Jane Mulford, is also listed as being born there. Family information and census data say they were
both from "Schoharie Co., NY".
3. Was George's father a Loyalist in the Revolutionary War and he and the family were ashamed
of this fact, so it was never discussed?
4. According to the 1855 census George was 54 years old, born in Schoharie Co., but only lived
there for 24 years. His wife is also listed as being born in Schoharie Co., and living there 24 years. His
son Moses is listed as 27 years old and born in Greene
Co., NY. So George must have been living in Greene Co., NY, and
his son Moses was born there. Where did he live for 30 years? In Greene Co.?
5. Maybe George was illegitimate and was never told of his parentage. People didn't discuss
things like this in the "old days."

There is some compelling reason why George's parentage was never recorded? Why? I'm certain
that family members knew, but never talked about it. I'm certain that Emma (Cole) Shafer knows! I don't
think anything ever got past her. She is very sharp!

WHAT'S YOUR THEORY?????

Submitted by: Herman W. Witthoft, Sr.
141 Hudson Ave.
Chatham, NY 12037-1431
Tel: 518-392-4544

WILL OF JOHANNIS SCHÄFFER

The Last Will and Testament of Johannis Scheffer, recorded 8 February 1788 in the Book of Wills,
1787-1791, Volume I, page 57, Surrogates Court, Albany County, NY:

In the name of God, Amen. I, Johannes Scheffer of Schoharry, in the county of Albany, being weak in
body and of perfect disposing sound mind and memory thanks be to God for the same, but calling to mind
the uncertainty of this transitory life and that all flesh must die and hereby revoking all former will or wills,
Testament and Testaments, heretofore by me made and declared to be made, do, make, ordain, publish
and declare this my last Will and Testament, In manner and form following, first and principally being
Penitent and heartily Sorrey (sic) for my sins, I commit my immortal soul after its departure out of this frail
body into the merciful hands of Almighty God In Whom and by whose mercy I trust and assuredly believe
to be saved, and my body I commit to the earth to be decently interred at the discretion of my executors
and for the disposing of such temporal Estate which it hath pleased God to bless me within this life, I do
give and dispose thereof in manner and form following.

Imprimes I do order that my just Debts and funeral expenses be thereout first be paid and satisfied;
Item I do give and bequeath to my oldest son, Johannes Scheffer my Rifle gun and all my wearing clothes
both lining and Wooling of what kind of nature so ever for his birthright or primogeniture where with he is
to be content and make no claim to any estate more than what hereafter is further bequeathed unto to him.
Item I do give and bequeath to my beloved daughter Elizabeth Kniskern, the wife of Hendrick Kniskern
my feather bed with the Bedstead pillows bolster Sheets blankets Rug Curtains and all furniture belonging
to it, and to her heirs Executors administrators or Assigns forever.

Item I do give and bequeath to my beloved son Jacob Scheffer and to his heirs Executors and
Administrators the just full and Equal half part of four hundred and seventy one Acres of land lying and
being at Cobus kill in the eighteen thousand acre patent and lays on each side of the old patent, to me
belonging.

Item I do give and bequeath to my beloved son Martinus Scheffer and to his heirs Executors and
Administrators all and singular my real estate Lands measuages (sp.?) and Tenements lying and being at
Schoharry to me belonging with their and every of their appurtenances and also my sheep, horses and also
my Negro man named Jack and also my Wagon Slays Harrows Plough and all other material belonging
to the farm and likewise my little trunk with all my writings and my pepper mill and my lanthorn and likewise
my bellows.

Item I do give and bequeath unto my beloved grandson Johannes Scheffer and son to Martinus Scheffer
my French Gun and my broad sword to him his heirs Executors or Administrators.

Item I do give and bequeath unto my beloved grandchildren Johannes Scheffer, Lambert Scheffer,
Catharine Scheffer and Hendrick and to their heirs and Assigns forever to each and to each of their
respective heirs or Assigns the one full fourth Part of one half part of four hundred and seventy one acres of
Land lying and being at Cobus kill in the eighteen thousand acres patent to me belonging, share and share
alike upon trust and Confidence the one no more than the other, And also all my personally Estate of what
kind or nature soever, except what I have here above given and bequeathed to be equally divided between
my said Children, share and share alike to one no more than the other to wit my son my Johannes Scheffer
or his heirs, Executors, Administrators or Assigns forever and to my son Jacob Scheffer or his heirs,
Executors, Administrators or Assigns forever, and to my son Martinus Scheffer or his heirs Executors,
Adminitrators or Assigns forever and to my son Adam Scheffer or to his heirs, Executors, Administrators
or Assigns forever and to my daughter Elizabeth Kniskern, wife of Hendrick Kniskern or to her heirs,
Executors, Administrators or Assigns and Assigns and the sixth part or remainder sixth part thereof among
all the children of my son Hendrick Scheffer deceased, Johannes, Lambert, Catharine and Hendrick
Scheffer to their heirs and Assigns to each and to each of their respective heirs and Assigns the one full true
and equal sixth part to be equally divided between them share and share alike the one no more than the
other.

And it is my express order that my son Martinus Scheffer or his heirs, Executors or Administrators shall
well and truly pay thereof unto all my four sons and Daughter to each of my four sons and my Daughter or
their respective heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns the one full true and just fifth part of eighty pound
lawful Money of New York in manner and form following that is to say sixteen pound to my son Johannes,
his heirs, Executors, Administrators or Assigns, sixteen pound to my son Jacob his heirs Administrators or
Assigns, sixteen pound to my son Adam Scheffer his heirs Executors, Administrators or Assigns. Sixteen
pound to my Daughter Kniskern the wife of Henry Kniskern her heirs Executors Administrators or Assigns
and remainder sixteen pound among my grandchildren Johannes, Lambert, Katherine and Hendrick
Scheffer, children of my son Hendrick Scheffer deceased to their heirs or Assigns to each of their
respective heirs or Assigns the just and full sum of sixteen pounds to be equally Divided between my said
grandchildren share and share alike the one no more than the other.

And lastly I do nominate and appoint my two sons Jacob Scheffer and Mathinas Scheffer Executors of this
last will and Testament.

In witness I the said Johannnes Scheffer have to this my last Will and Testament set my hand and Seal this
sixteenth day of July in the eleventh year of his majesty's Reign Anno Q Domina 16 July 1771.
Signed, sealed published and declared by the testator
to be his last will and Testament in the presence of
us whose Names are subscribed by and at the request of
the testator and in his presence.
Joseph Bevin
Johannes Ingolt
John VanVort Johannes Scheffer (Seal)
County of Albany:

Be it remembered that on the first day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand seven
hundred and eight-eight personally appeared before me, Abraham G. Lansing Surrogate of the County of
Albany, Johannes Ingolt of Schohary in the County of Albany aforesaid Farmer and being duly sworn on
his Oath declared that he did see Johannes Shaffer sign and Seal the Instrument wrote on this and the two
sheets of paper hereto annexed purporting to be the Will of the said Johannes Shaffer and heard him publish
and declare the same as and for his last Will and Testament that at the time thereof he the said Johannes
Shaffer was of sound and disposing mind and memory to the best knowledge and belief of this Deponent
and that his Name subscribed to the said Will is of his own, proper handwriting and that he saw Joseph
Bevin and John Van Vort the other witnesses to the same subscribe their Names as Witnesses thereto.
Abm. G. Lansing, Surrogate.
I certify the preceeding to be a true Copy of the Original Will of Johannis Schaffer deceased (except the
word - three in the 20th Line in the first page of the original obliterated) and the word eighteen interlined -and
the word three in the eighth Line of the original obliterated in the second page and the word eighteen
underlined.
Abm. Lansing Surrogate
Albany 8 February 1788.

WILL OF ADAM SHAFER
ADAM SHAFER, COBLESKILL - Dated: 20 December 1817.
Probated: 30 January 1819.

WILLS AND TESTAMENT BOOK, 1813 - 1823, Book B, Pages 248 - 252; Book on file at the
Schoharie County Surrogate's Office, Schoharie, NY.

The last will and testament of Adam Shafer In the name of God Amen. I Adam Shafer of the town
of Cobleskill in the County of Schoharie being weak in body but sound of mind and perfect mind and
memory, considering the uncertainty of this mortal life and being blessed, Almighty God for the same, Do
make and publish this my last will and testament, in manner and form following that is to say -
FIRST I give and bequeath unto my eldest son Johannes Shafer all my wearing apparel to his heirs
and assigns for ever.

SECONDLY I give and bequeath unto my son, Jost Shafer his heirs and assigns forever a certain
piece or parcel of land now in his possession being by estimation almost the one third part of Lot Number
eight and takes its beginning at a stone marked number Seven and eight, and runs from thence South fifteen
degrees to the French Kill so called, Thence up the same as it winds and turns to the Cobleskill - thence
along said Kill to the division line of lot Number eight and nine - thence Southerly on the said line to the
Patent line of the old Cobleskill patent, thence Easterly along said head line till it strikes the division line of
lot Number Seven and eight - thence along said line to the place of beginning excepted and reserving the
Grist mill with all the buildings, and lands thereunto belonging as hereafter will be mentioned; which said
mill with the appurtenances I give and bequeath unto my son Henry Shafer Jun.

THIRDLY I give and bequeath unto my son Dewald Shafer his heirs and assigns forever one
hundred and six acres of land where he is now in his possession of:

FOURTHLY I give and bequeath unto my son Henry Shafer Jun his heirs and assigns forever a
certain piece or parcel of land with the grist mill thereon now in the possession of Adam H. Shafer being
in Cobleskill aforesaid being part of lot number Eight beginning at a place where the Bennerkill Kill empties
itself in the Cobleskill, thence to follow the said Kill westerly till where a small run of water runs down the
bank - thence to the line of Number eighth and nine the nearest way that can be taken, thence along said
line a Southerly direction across the Cobleskill, thence to follow the said Kill to the Benner Kill - thence
to follow the turnings and windings of the said Benner Kill to the line of the mill seat - thence to follow the
said line of the said grist mill spot as it has been heretofore been leased to Jacob Kromer to the bridge that
crossed the Cobleskill - thence along on the bank of said Cobleskill on the South side of said Kill till it
strikes the division line a Northerly course to the public highway, as it now runs, thence a South westerly
direction to the place of beginning.

FIFTHLY I give and bequeath unto Adam A Shafer and David A Shafer sons of my son Adam
Shafer Junior their heirs and assigns for ever All the Remainder part of my real estate in the town of
Cobleskill in the County of Schoharie with the apurtenances thereunto belonging, To have and hold unto
the said Adam A Shafer and the said David A Shafer and to their heirs and assigns forever.

SIXTHLY I give unto Magdalene Shafer wife of my son Adam Shafer Jur deceased the one third
part of all the income and profits of that part of my farm granted to Adam A Shafer and David A Shafer
sons of my son Adam Shafer Jun deceased as long as she remains a widow

SEVENTHLY This is my will and order that my son Dewald Shafer shall pay to my daughter Maria
wife of Jacob Merkle the sum of twenty five dollars to be paid two years after my decease.

EIGHTHLY This is my will and order that my son Dewald Shafer shall pay twelve dollars and fifty
cents to my daughter Elizabeth wife of Jacob Frister one year after my decease.

NINTHLY This is my will and order that my son Jost Shafer shall pay to my daughter Lana wife
of Peter Ball the sum of twelve dollars and fifty cents two years after my death

TENTHLY I further give and bequeath unto Cherney Shafer and Rasson Shafer sons of Adam J
(?) Shafer two acres of land on the north side of the public highway at the point at Cobleskill to be taken
out of the lot or farm which I have given or granted to my son Jost Shafer, to have and to hold unto the said
Cherney Shafer and the said Kussen Shafer (sp?) to their heirs and assigns forever.

ELEVENTHLY This is will and order that Adam A Shafer and David A Shafer sons of my son
Adam Shafer Jun shall give to Peter Shafer Becker a son of John Jost Becker a span of horses in the place
of a span of horses which was left on my premises at the time of his grandfathers decease.

TWELFTHLY This is my will and order that Adam A Shafer and David A Shafer sons of my son
Adam Shafer Jun deceased shall pay to Lana Maria a daughter of John Jost Becker the sum of Fifty dollars
at the time when she arrives to the age of eighteen years.

THIRTEENTHLY I give and bequeath to my Henry Shafer Jun and to Magdalene Shafer wife
of my son Adam Shafer decease a thirty dollar note given to my by Henry Mann.

FOURTEENTHLY I give and bequeath unto Adam A Shafer and David A Shafer all my residue
of personal estate to equally be divided between them, and also the real estate which I have granted to them
to be equally be divided between them

LASTLY I appoint my sons Henry Shafer Jun Adam A Shafer and David Shafer executors of this
last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made.

In Witness Whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twentieth day of December in the
year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and seventeen
Signed, Sealed, published and declared by the above named Adam Shafer to be his last will and
testament.
In the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names a witness in the presence of
Henry Shafer.Henry Mann Adam Shafer L.S.
Jacob X H. Miller
His Mark

NOTE: I, Herman Witthoft, copied this will by hand, 11 March 1992, at the Schoharie County Surrogate's
Office, Schoharie, NY, and later, at home, entered it into my computer using the word processing program
WordPerfct 5.1. The spellings, captializations and punctuation, or lack of them, are as they appeared on
the original hand written document on file.

THE LOYAL AMERICANS
SHAVER EMIGRANTS TO CANADA

This is the story of three different Schaeffer/Shaver families that remained loyal to England during the
American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783, settling in Dundas and Stormont Counties, Ontario, Canada.
The first family, descendants of Maria Elizabeth Schaeffer, were Maria Schaeffer, 1750-1833, who
married Jacob Merkle, and Johannes Schaeffer, 1751-1828, both children of Adam Schaeffer and Maria
Magdalena Hilts; Nicolas Schaeffer, 1752-1838, and Friederick Schaeffer, 1760-1818, both sons of Johannes
Schaeffer, Jr. and Anna Gerdraut Staring. These family members are documented in baptisms and marriages at
St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Schoharie, Schoharie Co., NY USA.

The members of the second family were descendants of Nicholas Shaver, c.1726-c.1805, who was born
in Nassau, Germany. Nothing is known about his place of German origin, what year he came to America or where
he first settled. The first reference to him and his family were baptisms of his children at Trinity Lutheran Church,
Stone Arabia, Town of Palatine, Montgomery Co., NY USA.

The members of the third family were descendants of Philip Shaver, Sr., 1731-1805, who was born in
Germany. Nothing is known about his place of German origin, what year he came to America or where he first
settled. The first reference to him and his family were baptisms of his children at Caughnawaga Reformed Church,
Fonda, Town of Mohawk, Montgomery Co., NY USA.

There is no proof that members of the first family are related to either of the other two families or that the
second and third families are related to each other, so we have three unrealted families moving to Canada before,
during and after the American Revolutionary War.

This book contains 146 Schaeffer descendants of the first family, Maria Elizabeth Schaeffer, 106
descendants of Maria, 506 of Johannes, 830 of Nicholas and 1,911 of Frederick; 650 of Nicholas Shaver, the
second family and 1,036 of Philip Shaver, the third family, a total of 5,265 Shavers, plus their spouses.
This is the second book on the Schaeffer/Shaver family. The first, THE DESCENDANTS OF MARIA
ELIZABETH SCHÄFFER, EMIGRANT TO AMERICA, published in 1999, and covered 8,168 of her
descendants, mostly those who sided with the American cause. It was difficult to determine an appropriate title
for this second book, but it was finally decided to name it, THE LOYAL AMERICANS, SHAVER
EMIGRANTS TO CANADA.

This book is one volume, soft cover, perfect bound, contains about 800 pages and an every name index.
There are personal notes on many names, giving available data as birth, baptismal and marriage records, military
history, personal anecdotes, obituaries, occupation, education and more.
Copies of the book are available, $47.50, plus $5.00 shipping in the USA, total $52.50, or $15.00 shipping
to Canada, total $62.50, all USA money, check or money order. Place your order with Herman Witthoft, 141
Hudson Ave., Chatham, NY 12037 USA, Telephone: 518-392-4544, E-mail: hw15@juno.com. Your check
will not be cashed until the book is printed, on or about 15 March 2000..HERMAN W. WITTHOFT, SR.
141 Hudson Ave.
Chatham, NY 12037-1431
Tel: 518-392-4544
E-mail: hw15@juno.com
5 February 2000

Dear Schaeffer/Shaver Kin,
As described on the enclosed sheet, THE LOYAL AMERICANS, SHAVER EMIGRANTS
TO CANADA, this book is the story of three different Schaeffer/Shaver families who remained loyal to
England during the American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783.

The first family described in the book are the descendant families of Maria Elizabeth Schaeffer,
Maria, Nicholas and Frederick. The second family are the descendants of Nicholas Shaver and the third
family are descendants of Philip Shaver. There is no proof that members of the first family are related to
either of the other two families or that the second and third families are related to each other, so we have
three unrelated families moving to Canada from America before, during and after the American
Revolutionary War.

This is the second book on the Schaeffer/Shaver family. The first, THE DESCENDANTS OF
MARIA ELIZABETH SCHÄFFER, EMIGRANT TO AMERICA, was published in 1999, and
covered 8,168 of her descendants, mostly those who sided with the American cause. (This edition is sold
out, but is available at most major libraries.)

This book, THE LOYAL AMERICANS, SHAVER EMIGRANTS TO CANADA, is one
volume, soft cover, perfect bound, contains about 800 pages and an every name index. There are personal
notes on many names, giving available data as birth, baptismal and marriage records, military history,
personal anecdotes, obituaries, occupation, education and more.
Copies of this book are availbale, $47.50, plus $5.00 shipping in the USA, total $52.50 or $15.00
shipping to Canada, total $62.50, all USA money, check or money order.
Please send your money to me at the above address. Your check will not be cashed until the book
is printed, on or about 15 March 2000.
Thank you and I await your early response.
Sincerely yours,
Herman W. Witthoft, Sr.

THE LOYAL AMERICANS
SHAVER EMIGRANTS TO CANADA

This is the story of three different Schaeffer/Shaver families that remained loyal to England during
the American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783, settling in Dundas and Stormont Counties, Ontario, Canada.
The first family, descendants of Maria Elizabeth Schaeffer, were Maria Schaeffer, 1750-1833,
who married Jacob Merkle, and Johannes Schaeffer, 1751-1828, both children of Adam Schaeffer and
Maria Magdalena Hilts; Nicolas Schaeffer, 1752-1838, and Friederick Schaeffer, 1760-1818, both
sons of Johannes Schaeffer, Jr. and Anna Gerdraut Staring. These family members are documented in
baptisms and marriages at St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Schoharie, Schoharie Co., NY USA.
The members of the second family were descendants of Nicholas Shaver, c.1726-c.1805, who
was born in Nassau, Germany. Nothing is known about his place of German origin, what year he came
to America or where he first settled. The first reference to him and his family were baptisms of his children
at Trinity Lutheran Church, Stone Arabia, Town of Palatine, Montgomery Co., NY USA.

The members of the third family were descendants of Philip Shaver, Sr., 1731-1805, who was
born in Germany. Nothing is known about his place of German origin, what year he came to America or
where he first settled. The first reference to him and his family were baptisms of his children at
Caughnawaga Reformed Church, Fonda, Town of Mohawk, Montgomery Co., NY USA.

There is no proof that members of the first family are related to either of the other two families or
that the second and third families are related to each other, so we have three unrealted families moving to
Canada before, during and after the American Revolutionary War.

This book contains 146 Schaeffer descendants of the first family, Maria Elizabeth Schaeffer, 106
descendants of Maria, 506 of Johannes, 830 of Nicholas and 1,91 of Frederick; 650 of Nicholas Shaver,
the second family and 1,036 of Philip Shaver, the third family, a total of 5,265 Shavers, plus their spouses.
This is the second book on the Schaeffer/Shaver family. The first, THE DESCENDANTS OF
MARIA ELIZABETH SCHÄFFER, EMIGRANT TO AMERICA, published in 1999, and covered
8,168 of her descendants, mostly those who sided with the American cause. It was difficult to determine
an appropriate title for this second book, but it was finally decided to name it, THE LOYAL
AMERICANS, SHAVER EMIGRANTS TO CANADA.

This book is one volume, soft cover, perfect bound, contains about 800 pages and an every name
index. There are personal notes on many names, giving available data as birth, baptismal and marriage
records, military history, personal anecdotes, obituaries, occupation, education and more.
Copies of the book are available, $47.50, plus $5.00 shipping in the USA, total $52.50, or $15.00
shipping to Canada, total $62.50, all USA money, check or money order. Place your order with Herman
Witthoft, 141 Hudson Ave., Chatham, NY 12037 USA, Telephone: 518-392-4544, E-mail:
hw15@juno.com.

 

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